The Department of Labor Announces Increased National Average Weekly Wage Now in Effect

The time has come for the annual adjustment in Longshore and Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act (LHWCA) rates. The Department of Labor, which administers the Longshore Act, has announced the new National Average Weekly Wage (NAWW) of $735.89; an increase of 2.46 percent over the previous NAWW. This NAWW will be in effect from October 1, 2017 through September 30, 2018, and will affect ongoing permanent total disability benefits and death
Continue reading...

North Carolina Court of Appeals Holds Calculations of Average Weekly Wage Must Be “Fair and Just” to Both Employer and Employee

The North Carolina Court of Appeals ruled that when calculating the average weekly wage of an employee, the calculation must be “fair and just” to both the employer and the employee. In Ball v. Bayada Home Health Care, the plaintiff alleged to have suffered injuries to her left hand, bilateral knees, and right hip while employed as a certified nursing assistant (CNA) in February 2011. Her accident took place on the
Continue reading...

Waging the War of Wages: Board Revises Employer’s Statement of Wage Earnings (Form C-240)

On June 19, 2017, the Office of the Chair of the Workers’ Compensation Board in New York issued an official Revision of Employer’s Statement of Wage Earnings — at parties, it simply goes by the Form C-240. For the most part, the Form C-240 has stayed true to its roots: it is still required where an injured worker may be entitled to compensation or death benefits, it still demonstrates the claimant’s
Continue reading...

Paid Vacation Weeks Should Be Included in Total Gross Wages and Number of Weeks Worked When Calculating Average Weekly Wages

Generally, the average weekly wages (AWW) equals total gross wages from the 52 weeks prior to the injury, divided by the number of calendar weeks the claimant was employed during that 52-week time period. C.G.S. §31-310. When making the calculation, we do not include absences of seven or more consecutive calendar days or partial weeks worked either at the beginning of employment or on the week of injury. Id. However,
Continue reading...