Jurisdictional Speed Bumps in the Trucking Industry

When are Claims Compensable in New York Workers’ Compensation Law? Workers’ Compensation claims are usually straight-forward – a claimant is injured on the job and brings a claim for benefits. Sometimes, though, claims are not always that simple at the outset. A claimant may live in one state, and be injured in a different state, while working for an employer whose base is in a third state. These situations can
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Verbal Threshold Does Not Bar Employers’ Subrogation

Section 40 of the New Jersey workers’ compensation statute allows employers or workers’ compensation carriers to automatically receive reimbursement of benefits paid to an injured worker from a third party tortfeasor – either directly from the tortfeasor, or from an award received by the injured worker in a third party claim. But what happens when an injured worker is barred from suing the third party tortfeasor? Can the employer or
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Recent Trends an “Inextricably Intertwined’ Universe

Oftentimes we see applicants who sustain a specific injury but continue to work thereafter and simultaneously developed a cumulative trauma injury. When evaluating an applicant, the California Labor Code specifically requires a physician to determine what percentage of disability was caused by each industrial injury. This is consistent with the new system of apportionment under SB 899 and the enactment of Labor Code section 4663 and section 4664 which is based
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The Holidays are Over. Is Your Office Party Injury Compensable?

Employers throw annual parties for the employees to commemorate another successful year. Of course, once the music starts going and the drinks start flowing, the employers are left with an annual headache of a question – are employees that were injured in relation to these festivities covered under Workers’ Compensation? While compensability for office party injuries is a highly fact-intensive determination, claimants usually emerge victorious. Generally, even if the party
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Average Weekly Wage Calculation

Average weekly wage (AWW) can be a significant factor in determining a carrier’s exposure in a workers’ compensation case in New York because it is the basis for indemnity benefits calculation for the duration of the case.  The compensation rate on a case is two-thirds of the AWW, subject to a statutory cap. There are several methods for calculating AWW in New York.  New York Workers’ Compensation Law (WCL) §
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PFME: What Exactly Does it Mean and Why is it Important to Understand?

As we all know when a workers’ compensation claim is brought forward, the claimant needs to prove two basic points: (1) that he or she has an injury or illness and (2) that the illness or injury was obtained while in the course and scope of his or her employment. For a claim that is accepted from its inception, the above two points are generally easy to find in the
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North Carolina Industrial Commission Uncovers Workers’ Compensation Fraudulent Activity in Craven County, North Carolina

The North Carolina Industrial Commission recently charged a woman with workers’ compensation fraud in Craven County, North Carolina. Ms. Kimberly Ann Sutton has been charged with two counts of workers’ compensation fraud and two counts of obtaining property by false pretense. Fraud investigators found evidence that Ms. Sutton was working at the same time that she was simultaneously receiving workers’ compensation benefits. There was also evidence that she failed to
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Is a Workplace Injury Caused by a Non-Occupational Medical Condition Compensable? Connecticut Appellate Court says “Yes” in Clements v. Aramark Corporation

It is a fundamental principle of Connecticut workers’ compensation law that in order for an injury to be compensable, it must occur in the course of and arise out of the claimant’s employment. In the recent Appellate Court decision of Clements v. Aramark Corp., the court considered whether an employee who fell and injured herself at work due to an unrelated medical condition met this burden. In a critical decision
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Moratorium to all Moratoriums

Public Act No. 11-205 significantly impacts the way in which the Connecticut Worker’s Compensation Act (C.G.S. § 31-275 through 31-355b) is applied. Generally, under Connecticut’s Worker’s Compensation laws, when an employee is injured in a work related accident, he/she is entitled to worker’s compensation benefits for their injuries. The employer is required to pay both indemnity and medical benefits, in exchange for the employee’s right to sue. However, if the
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Idiopathic Injuries: Dealing with Injuries that Occur at Work, But Are Not Work-Related in New Jersey

We have all come across the case where an employee is injured at work, but the injury doesn’t seem to arise from something we would consider work-related. The injury could have just as easily happened at some time or place other than while the employee was at work. For example, the worker is walking down an aisle toward his workstation, his ankle gives out, and he falls. He didn’t trip.
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