North Carolina Court of Appeals Affirms Industrial Commission’s Denial of Bellwether Cases

The North Carolina Court of Appeals recently affirmed the Industrial Commission’s denial of claims, collectively known as the bellwether cases, that constituted a small portion of 144 consolidated workers’ compensation claims. Specifically, Walter Hinson, decedent-employee, worked for Continental Tire the Americas at its factory in Charlotte, North Carolina. The decedent’s estate alleged that his employment exposed him to levels of harmful airborne asbestos sufficient to cause asbestos-related disease. In addition
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The Perils of Paragraph Three – Mind Your Step

When a case is resolved by way of a Compromise & Release (C&R), parties often believe that all pertinent issues (including claims of injury and body parts) have been disposed of in the settlement. This is because settlements will carefully delineate all of the body parts and claims that are being resolved in the written agreement. What do we make of the applicant who decides to file a subsequent claim
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Schedule Loss of Use Award or Classification? Litigation Trends Following Taher

On June 14, 2018, the Third Department of the New York State Appellate Division issued the decision Matter of Taher v. Yiota Taxi. In Taher, the Third Department addressed the question of whether a claimant may receive both a schedule loss of use (SLU) award and classification arising out of the same work-related injury at the time of permanency. Ultimately, the Third Department held that a claimant cannot receive both
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Recreational Marijuana and Workers’ Compensation: What Employers Need to Know

With the impending legalization of recreational marijuana in Illinois on January 1, 2020, employers are abuzz about the potential implications on their operations, particularly how legalization impacts alleged work injuries. Under the Illinois Workers’ Compensation Act, employees found intoxicated at the time of an accident are denied compensation if the intoxication was the proximate cause of the injury or if the employee was so intoxicated it constituted a departure from
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The Effect of Immigration on New York Workers’ Compensation

New York state has one of the largest undocumented immigrant populations in the nation, coming in fourth behind Texas, California, and Florida. According to the most recent study taken by Pew Research Center in 2016, 725,000 unauthorized immigrants lived in New York state. Although it is illegal for employers to hire immigrant workers who are not documented and authorized to work in the United States, whether it is intentional or
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Undocumented Immigrants Lose Out on Benefits

Under the Connecticut workers’ compensation statutes (codified under Title 31), immigrants who are not U.S. citizens enjoy many, but not all, of the same rights as U.S. citizens. The workers’ compensation system affords medical and indemnity benefits to eligible claimants. Within the indemnity category, there are lost time benefits, permanency benefits, and earning impairment benefits. Particularly, this eligibility hinges on whether an individual is documented and can legally work in
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Caring for Construction Worker Employees Could Lead to a Reduction in Workplace Accidents

At a recent OSHA training course, multiple construction workers expressed that their biggest concern regarding safety was associated with how their employer respected their own safety at a job site. If their employer respected safety over rushing a project and cutting corners, the construction workers expressed that they noticed fewer worker-related injuries. While the construction employer may believe they are saving costs by completing a project quickly, this could cost more
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Connecticut Legislative Update: Workers’ Compensation Coverage Expanded for Some First Responders

In a rare legislative change to Connecticut Workers’ Compensation Law, Gov. Ned Lamont recently signed into law Senate Bill No. 164 (Public Act 19-17), which expands workers’ compensation coverage for some first responders who experience mental or emotional impairment following certain traumatic events experienced in the line of duty. Specifically, the bill allows for police officers, firefighters, and parole officers that have been diagnosed with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) to
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Construction Sites, Injured Contractors & Workers’ Compensation

In Connecticut, the “traditional” rules of workers’ compensation are relatively well established. A restaurant employee cuts his finger preparing food on shift; a home health aide pulls a muscle in her back while moving a patient on shift; a delivery truck driver gets into a motor vehicle accident while delivering to a customer. But what if you are a contractor or subcontractor on a job/site and get injured? Do you
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Causal Relationship for Preauthorized Surgeries: Questioning Causality

It is easy to accept preauthorized surgeries as a foregone conclusion where the site of surgery is established and the procedure is approved by the Medical Treatment Guidelines. However, it shouldn’t be. Earlier in 2019, Goldberg Segalla’s workers’ compensation team won an appeal on this very issue. The claimant underwent preauthorized left shoulder surgery on a file established to the left shoulder for an injury that occurred in 2016. However,
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