Employer Reimbursement for a Salary Continuation Plan

New York State Workers’ Compensation Law (WCL) Section 25 governs how compensation is paid under a workers’ compensation claim. WCL Section 25(4)(a) was designed to encourage employers to continue wage payments to workers during periods of work-related disability by providing the employers with a statutorily protected source of repayment. Landgrebe v. County of Westchester, 453 N.Y.S.2d 413 (1982). WCL Section 25(4)(a) allows an employer to recover reimbursement for payments made
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Credit on SLU Payments and Recovery of a Third-Party Action Lien: Why They Live Together in Perfect Harmony

In New York, Workers’ Compensation Law Section 15(4-a) provides a carrier the right to take a credit against a subsequently determined schedule award for disability payments that have already been received for the same injury. This is relatively common knowledge in the world of workers’ compensation, and this credit is never met with much pushback from claimant’s counsel – unless, of course, a third-party action is involved. Under Workers’ Compensation
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The Interstate Medical Provider Claim: Unsettled Jurisdictional Questions Open the Floodgates in New Jersey

As overall filings in the New Jersey Workers’ Compensation Courts have been falling, one particular type of claim is on the rise: the Medical Provider Application for Payment or Reimbursement of Medical Payment. The statutory authority for these “Medical Provider Claim Petitions” (MCPs) is found in a single sentence in the depths of New Jersey Statutes Annotated 34:15-15: “[e]xclusive jurisdiction for any disputed medical charge arising from any claim for
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Maryland Legislature Says “Yea” To Additional Medical Presumptions, “Nay” To Medical Cannabis Reform in Workers’ Compensation Cases

The 2019 Maryland legislative session only produced one substantive law change that impacts the Maryland Workers’ Compensation framework. Additionally, two bills that did not get passed also sent conspicuous messages to practitioners within the bar. The lone bill implicating Maryland Workers’ Compensation that was passed into Law is House Bill 595, which was approved by Governor Larry Hogan on April 30, 2019. The bill serves as an amendment to Labor
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The Carriers’ New Tool: Jacobi Medical Center

There are very few concepts under the New York Workers’ Compensation system that are in favor of the employer and carrier. Once a claim is established, employers and carriers have few tools on their side to even the playing field in the claimant-friendly world of workers’ compensation. In appropriate situations, for example, employers and carriers can litigate the issues of labor market attachment, fraud under WCL 114(a), and further causally
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Raising Self-Limitation on Reduced Earnings: A New Approach

How many times has your attorney heard this whispered after raising labor market attachment:  “Just go get any job out there and they’ll pay you the difference – any job will do.” If you work two hours a week, you’re attached and owed reduced earnings. This scenario came up during a recent litigation on the issue of labor market attachment and entitlement to awards. In that case, the claimant’s attorney
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Conflict Over Neutral Risk Work Injuries

Neutral risk injuries have become a contentious topic in Illinois Workers’ Compensation law. In Illinois Senate Bill 12, the legislature attempted to codify recent trends that courts have taken by calling for an analysis of whether an injured worker’s employment quantitatively or qualitatively contributes to a neutral risk to determine a compensable injury. The First District Appellate Court of Illinois applied these factors in Noonan v. Illinois Workers’ Compensation Commission
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Revisiting Apportionment for Private Sector Injuries in the District of Columbia

On May 2, 2019, the Compensation Review Board (CRB) issued a decision opening the door for apportionment claims in private sector injuries in the District of Columbia. James M. Lyles, Jr. v. Howard University Hospital, (CRB No. 17-036). This decision was in response to a remand from the D.C. Court of Appeals directing the CRB to revisit their interpretation of D.C. Code § 32-1508 (6). The crux of the analysis
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Use Of 200 Multiple For Part-Time/Intermittent Workers Often Results In Windfall To Claimants

One of the most contentious parts of a claim can be setting the average weekly wage (AWW), as it determines a claimant’s benefit rate for the life of the claim, including entitlement to reduced earnings. Certainly, at times, the method chosen by the Board for setting an AWW can arguably result in an “artificial inflation” of a claimant’s wages. This is particularly true with part-time or sporadic employees, who oftentimes
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Shifting Liability: A Lesson for General Contractors

Imagine this, you, a general contractor based in New Jersey, just secured a project from one of the biggest retailers to do some work at its warehouse in New York. Given the magnitude of the project, part of the work is subcontracted to another New Jersey company that guarantees it has workers’ compensation insurance. The project begins and you are unfamiliar with the number of subcontractor employees on-site, their day-to-day
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