North Carolina Governor Signs Bill Aimed at Protecting Employees from Misclassification

On August 11, 2017, North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper signed into law Senate Bill 407, which creates Article 82, Chapter 183 of the state’s general statutes — more commonly known as the Employee Fair Classification Act (the Act). Quite simply, the Act creates an Employee Classification Division (ECD) within the North Carolina Industrial Commission, led by Director Bradley L. Hicks. The legislation creating the ECD was introduced in 2015 but
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North Carolina Court of Appeals Holds Calculations of Average Weekly Wage Must Be “Fair and Just” to Both Employer and Employee

The North Carolina Court of Appeals ruled that when calculating the average weekly wage of an employee, the calculation must be “fair and just” to both the employer and the employee. In Ball v. Bayada Home Health Care, the plaintiff alleged to have suffered injuries to her left hand, bilateral knees, and right hip while employed as a certified nursing assistant (CNA) in February 2011. Her accident took place on the
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Waging the War of Wages: Board Revises Employer’s Statement of Wage Earnings (Form C-240)

On June 19, 2017, the Office of the Chair of the Workers’ Compensation Board in New York issued an official Revision of Employer’s Statement of Wage Earnings — at parties, it simply goes by the Form C-240. For the most part, the Form C-240 has stayed true to its roots: it is still required where an injured worker may be entitled to compensation or death benefits, it still demonstrates the claimant’s
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Maryland on High Alert after Declaring State of Emergency

With communities nationwide struggling to address the booming opioid epidemic, Maryland is the first to declare a state of emergency in an attempt to rein in overdoses within its borders. In 2016, the Maryland residents suffered more than 2,700 fatal opioid overdoses; this figure is climbing at an alarming rate. The state of emergency declaration allowed Governor Larry Hogan discretion to allocate $50 million in funding to fight the epidemic
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The Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services Learns about Due Process: Amended Review of Approved Medicare Set-Asides and What it Means for Defense Bar

Recently, the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) promulgated a revised Medicare Set-Aside (MSA) Re-Review process. This “Amended Review” process is significant, as it actually provides those submitting MSAs for approval with an opportunity to revise and amend submitted MSA proposals upon an unfavorable determination from CMS. Previously, CMS has either been unwilling to re-review a submitted MSA or has limited its review following its determination. This has been
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Can I Apportion to that Prior Injury/Condition?

Apportionment is an excellent mitigation strategy for carriers/employers. There are a couple of different scenarios to review when addressing apportionment; however, the threshold issue is permanency. Generally speaking, New York State Workers’ Compensation Law does not permit apportionment prior to permanency. The most common form of apportionment involves a prior compensable event. Under this scenario, there is no requirement that the carrier/employer prove an “active and symptomatic condition” at the
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Missouri Governor Signs Bill Aimed at Reducing Workplace Injury Costs into Law

Throughout his campaign, Missouri Governor Eric Greitens promised to lead efforts to create a more business-friendly environment in Missouri. With only a short time remaining in the 2017 legislative session, the Missouri legislature approved Senate Bill 66, a measure focused at reforming Missouri’s worker’s compensation system.  On July 5, 2017, Governor Greitens made good on his promises and signed Senate Bill 66 into law. The bill contains several reforms that
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You Can’t Have Your Cake and Eat it Too — Maryland Court Interprets Controversial Phrase “Similar Benefits” and its Effect on Disability Pension Offsets

In Zakwieia v. Baltimore County, Board of Education, 231 Md. App. 644 (2017), the Court of Special Appeals of Maryland established the correct interpretation of LE § 9-610 and the controversial phrase “similar benefits.” As a result, the court’s holding provided a basis for the Board of Education of Baltimore County (the Board) to apply ordinary disability retirement benefits owed to the claimant as a credit against the claimant’s workers’
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Seeking Your Nomination

Attention blog readers! This year, the ABA Journal is publishing their first ever “Web 100” celebrating the best of the legal industry on the web. In order to be named, we’ll need your help! Since our launch this past spring, Workers’ Compensation Defense has been your source for current trends and precedent-setting litigation, to claims management and upcoming rule changes. We’ve also established our client portal, where current clients can find information
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Your Injury Happened Where? New Jersey Appellate Division Rejects Two Attempts to Avoid the Going and Coming Rule

Two recent decisions by the New Jersey Appellate Division upheld the strength of the “going and coming” rule to bar workers’ compensation claims that did not occur at work. In New Jersey, injuries that occur during routine travel to and from work are not compensable. This comes from principle found in N.J.S.A. 34:15-36 (defining “employment”) that generally, employment starts when the employee arrives at his place of employment, and terminates
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