Incarceration Upon Conviction of a Felony and its Effects on Attachment to the Labor Market

Attachment to the labor market is an important issue among employers and carriers. By pushing this issue, we can attempt to reduce indemnity costs and aid in the claimant’s return to work. Generally, a claimant who is temporarily partially disabled must show that he or she is attached to the labor market to be entitled to workers’ compensation benefits. The claimant need only seek employment within his or her restrictions,
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Conflict Over Neutral Risk Work Injuries

Neutral risk injuries have become a contentious topic in Illinois Workers’ Compensation law. In Illinois Senate Bill 12, the legislature attempted to codify recent trends that courts have taken by calling for an analysis of whether an injured worker’s employment quantitatively or qualitatively contributes to a neutral risk to determine a compensable injury. The First District Appellate Court of Illinois applied these factors in Noonan v. Illinois Workers’ Compensation Commission
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How Does it Work? Incarceration and Workers’ Compensation Benefits

The incarceration of a claimant receiving workers’ compensation benefits can be used as a defense to payment of indemnity benefits based on two similar, but distinct, arguments. In general, where the carrier has been directed to pay workers compensation indemnity benefits by the New York Workers’ Compensation Board, the carrier may only suspend indemnity benefits unilaterally (without a new direction from the board) in certain circumstances. Per 12 NYCRR Section
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New York Court of Appeals Caps the “Additional Compensation” Awarded to Claimants Who Exhaust a Schedule Loss of Use Award

On December 11, 2018, the New York State Court of Appeals decided Matter of Mancini v. Office of Children and Family Services, 2018 N.Y. Slip. Op. 08425, 2018 WL 6492707. At issue was the “additional compensation” entitled to injured workers who exhausted their Schedule of Loss award (SLU) when such award was 50 percent or greater. The claimant argued that the reference to WCL Section 15(3)(w) in Section 15(3)(v) only
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2019 Mileage Rates Reach Second Highest in Twenty Years

Every year the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) issues the annual mileage rates, and like clockwork, the IRS has released the updated rates for 2019. This year the mileage rate has increased from 54.5 cents per mile to 58 cents per mile, which reflects a 6.42 percent increase from 2018. A review of the mileage rates from 1997 to present show rates as low as 31 cents (1999) and as high
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Moratorium to all Moratoriums

Public Act No. 11-205 significantly impacts the way in which the Connecticut Worker’s Compensation Act (C.G.S. § 31-275 through 31-355b) is applied. Generally, under Connecticut’s Worker’s Compensation laws, when an employee is injured in a work related accident, he/she is entitled to worker’s compensation benefits for their injuries. The employer is required to pay both indemnity and medical benefits, in exchange for the employee’s right to sue. However, if the
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